Land of Droid http://www.landofdroid.com Fri, 03 Jun 2016 11:14:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.3 OnePlus Begin 1 Hour Shipping in UK via Amazon Prime http://www.landofdroid.com/2016/oneplus-begin-1-hour-shipping-in-uk-via-amazon-prime/ http://www.landofdroid.com/2016/oneplus-begin-1-hour-shipping-in-uk-via-amazon-prime/#respond Fri, 03 Jun 2016 11:14:58 +0000 http://www.landofdroid.com/?p=42216 OnePlus Begin 1 Hour Shipping in UK via Amazon Prime

The OnePlus 2 failed to reach the dizzy sales heights of its predecessor the One and despite that fact (and the fact that the OnePlus 3 is expected to be announced imminently) the Shenzen based company are still trying to offload the older stock of these handsets. In an email sent out yesterday the company […]

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OnePlus Begin 1 Hour Shipping in UK via Amazon Prime

The OnePlus 2 failed to reach the dizzy sales heights of its predecessor the One and despite that fact (and the fact that the OnePlus 3 is expected to be announced imminently) the Shenzen based company are still trying to offload the older stock of these handsets.

2016-06-03 11_55_49-Get your OnePlus 2 delivered in under an hour! - Postbox

In an email sent out yesterday the company announced that they have teamed up with Amazon and their Amazon Prime service to ship the handset to customers in under 60 minutes (which is impressive when you consider how long it took to get a One).

Dear Friends,

Have you got the need for speed?

Waiting just doesn’t fit in with our Never Settle mentality, and that’s why we’ve teamed up with Amazon to get you that OnePlus 2 you’ve been craving in under 60 minutes.

You can now order the OnePlus 2 via Amazon.co.uk and receive your device in under an hour if you’re eligible for Amazon Prime Now. Simply add the OnePlus 2 to your Amazon UK basket, select your delivery window, and wait (not long!) for the goods to arrive.

It’s never been easier (or faster) to join the OnePlus family. What are you waiting for?

Never Settle

Priced at £249 the “flagship killer” is still a decent enough device in today’s marketplace however with that said, when I went to place an order via Amazon Prime just now there was no option for a 1 hour delivery which does make me question if the service is only available in certain UK locations.

Would you still buy one at this price?

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Another Oneplus 2 update rolls out from today http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/another-oneplus-2-update-rolls-out-from-today/ http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/another-oneplus-2-update-rolls-out-from-today/#respond Tue, 01 Sep 2015 15:15:18 +0000 http://www.landofdroid.com/?p=42142 Another Oneplus 2 update rolls out from today

I guess one of the advantages of having a handset made by a company with so few products is that their developers get to spend a whole heap of time fixing any bugs. Today Oneplus have started rolling out a second incremental update for their latest device with a promise of a more substantial update […]

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Another Oneplus 2 update rolls out from today

I guess one of the advantages of having a handset made by a company with so few products is that their developers get to spend a whole heap of time fixing any bugs. Today Oneplus have started rolling out a second incremental update for their latest device with a promise of a more substantial update to come mid September.

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In OxygenOS 2.0.2, you’ll find the following:

  • Improvements to fingerprint recognition accuracy
  • Resolves a bug that could cause volume to be muted unexpectedly
  • Stability improvements to the front facing camera
  • Camera preview UX improvements

A 2.1 update with more significant improvements is on its way and currently scheduled for mid-September.

As well as today’s update the company has started working through the invite backlog with a bit of vigor this week, with 24 account linked invites hitting ordinary customers emails.

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Kazam Trooper 450L Review http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/kazam-trooper-450l-review/ http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/kazam-trooper-450l-review/#respond Tue, 01 Sep 2015 12:46:20 +0000 http://www.landofdroid.com/?p=42016 Kazam Trooper 450L Review

The Kazam Trouper 450L is not so much a phone as a package. You don’t buy just a handset, but rather you are buying a service that comes with a handset. I will cover the ins and outs of the service later but for now lets look at the phone. In the last year or […]

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Kazam Trooper 450L Review

The Kazam Trouper 450L is not so much a phone as a package. You don’t buy just a handset, but rather you are buying a service that comes with a handset. I will cover the ins and outs of the service later but for now lets look at the phone.

In the last year or so budget handsets have started to become a real alternative for those not wanting to break the bank on a flagship. No longer are they small slow units that exasperate more than they please. Kazam however have managed to let all that pass over them. To say the Trouper 450L is disappointing would be like saying losing a league title on the last day of the season to your bitterest rivals is only mildly upsetting. The Trouper is like a mid range handset from three years ago, not a device trying to be better than the sum of it’s specification sheet. The main specifications are below and they are as underwhelming in the hand as they are to read.

Specifications aside, how does the Trouper perform?

The Trouper runs a slightly skinned version of AOSP 4.4.4 so isn’t too far behind the curve in that respect, but the skin ‘enhancements’ are very dated looking, making the whole OS look more akin to Ice Cream Sandwich, and even Ginger Bread at times. Pull down the navigation bar and there are quick settings reminiscent of Touch Wiz of old with a sickly green colour by default. The whole effect with the default wallpaper is dull and dank, yet the settings panel is a far more pleasant white and light green, if only they had carried this through to the whole theme. Luckily Android is a versatile beast so by installing your favourite launcher from the Play Store some of these ills can be quickly remedied.

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In use you pretty much get what you would expect, a phone that can easily handle everyday tasks like calling, messaging and emailing but takes a little more time with slightly heavier tasks such as web page loading or playing YouTube video. Audio is muted and tinny sounding through the internal speaker and not recommended for more than little snippets. The screen I found to be the biggest disappointment and probably the source of my feeling for the device as a whole. There is little that an average user uses their smartphone for that doesn’t require more than an odd flick or press of the screen, so when it bombs, the phone bombs. The Trouper 450L has a very low resolution for a 5” display, a lot lower than we have become accustomed to. 240 dpi no longer cuts the mustard, and to make things worse I found it to either look washed out, or over saturated. The bottom edge always seemed to look duller than the rest of the screen to me, possibly to do with the way the back lighting is implemented.

Neither the front or back camera’s offer anything to shout about with the paltry 0.3 MP FFC being a step back in time that doesn’t glow with nostalgia. In the modern world of selfies and Snapchat I predict a lot more mirror shots from 450L users. The main camera isn’t as disappointing, with its budget standard 5.0 MP sensor, and shots don’t look too bad when viewed on a device that isn’t the 450L (the screen kills everything), just don’t expect a fast focus or great low light images. Overall the front camera is a waste of time and budget with the rear camera being more than adequate for gran or grandpa to snap the odd shot of little Tim.

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Everything about the design of the Kazam is cheap and it shows. The back and sides are encased in a metallic silver piece of plastic that would not look out of place on a pound shop kids toy, but at least it has grip thanks to a slightly ribbed effect. On top sits the audio jack just left of centre, with the USB port slightly to the right of centre on the bottom edge. A Volume rocker slightly protrudes on the upper left leaving the power button to sit alone of the upper right edge, just slightly too high for my thumb to comfortably reach while resting the phone on my pinkie (we all hold phones like that, right?). the front face is all glass with capacitive recent/menu, home and back keys on the bottom and a speaker grill, camera and light sensor at the top. The back cover pops off to give access to the SIM tray, an SD card slot and removable battery. Maybe their will be an option to buy a cover that’s not so cheap looking as well.

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Now to part 2 of the Trouper 450L package, the interesting bit. I said earlier that Kazam were not so much selling a phone as giving you a phone and selling you a service, and this is where the package comes into it’s own. Kazam have looked at the Android market and decided that in the UK nobody is catering for the technophobe or the clumsy oaf. We all see HTC offering free screen replacement in the US and ask why we can’t cut the same deal, well Kazam are offering free screen replacement on the 450L for accidental damage within the first year. As standard Kazam offer a 2 year warranty package but this can be extended by another year if the user installs 5 partner apps from the likes of Kindle, Amazon and McAfee (watch out for that last one). But rather than just rest on their laurels with the screen they are also offering technical support as well.

One of the few apps that Kazam have added is the Rescue app, which will allow a Kazam technician to take control of your device and sort any settings that may need adjusted (secured with a 6 digit pin that the user must enter to grant access). Kazam are effectively stepping into the role of the family/friend ‘technical’ person, the poor sod who gets a phone call every time Internet Explorer shows more tool bars than web content. Think of it, no more calls from your mum or dad asking how to change their wallpaper. For those tech savvy folk out their it may seem pointless, but the Trouper 450L isn’t aimed at them, it’s for the grandpa’s and grannies I mentioned earlier who still look for a pull dial on a phone and think a video call is sci-fi fantasy. For them, they just call Kazam and if the technician on the other end needs to change something he takes control of the phone and does what needs doing. Other OEM’s have support apps installed as standard, but none that I have come across offer anything near this level.

The big pity with the Trouper 450L is that Kazam didn’t up the price a little to make the handset a little better. A better screen and a little work on the default theme could make this a cracking package to recommend to it’s target audience but even with the exceptional support I could not, in all honesty tell a family member or friend to buy one. If this is the first step in bring this level of service to more capable units then it will definitely be worth watching.

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ONEPLUS 2 REVIEW http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/oneplus-2-review/ http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/oneplus-2-review/#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 14:25:19 +0000 http://www.landofdroid.com/?p=42026 ONEPLUS 2 REVIEW

Introduction After the massive hype surrounding their first foray into the mobile phone market, OnePlus have returned this year with a new handset and have tried to recreate the buzz around the original. Over the near sixteen months since OnePlus inflicted the invite system on us, so much has changed for them. They have alienated […]

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ONEPLUS 2 REVIEW

Introduction

After the massive hype surrounding their first foray into the mobile phone market, OnePlus have returned this year with a new handset and have tried to recreate the buzz around the original. Over the near sixteen months since OnePlus inflicted the invite system on us, so much has changed for them. They have alienated and annoyed large sections of the Android community with tasteless ill advised ‘competitions’ for invites, severed their ties with Cyanogen (possibly one of the main reasons their hype train gathered as much momentum as it did) and even managed to upset the Android Police team

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OnePlus are still brandishing the ‘flagship killer’ tag line that served them so well with the OnePlus One however this year consumers have far more choice in the sub £300 market than they had before so the claim carries a lot less weight. There have also been a couple of interesting choices with the hardware specification of the OnePlus 2 with the removal of NFC and deciding not to include either fast or wireless charging (all features you would expect on a current flagship). The OnePlus 2 is also a little more expensive than it’s older sibling, coming in at £289 for the 64G model (the unit under review here), as compared to £269 for the equivalent version of the One.

The OnePlus 2 went on sale on August the 11th using a supposedly updated version of the controversial invite system with a larger stock holding to speed the queue along. Delivery has been notably quicker and I have as yet to see any reports of hardware issues such as the yellow banding being reported on the OnePlus One screen at release.

Aesthetics

The OnePlus 2 is a solidly built unit, nothing feels below par or of a sub standard quality. Buttons and button holes fill as they should, edges between different surfaces meet and connect the way they are meant to with nothing protruding or indenting but instead continuing smooth lines. The whole unit has been manufactured and assembled very well completely devoid of sharp edges or little gaps.

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The signature black sandstone back is returns but this time there are more OEM options available for changing it and it is also a lot easier to snap off and on. The device is a little heavier than the previous model weighing in 13 grams more and also a little fatter being 1mm thicker, but the height and width are reduced coming in at 151.8 x 74.9 with the same 5.5” screen. Out of all the little small differences it is the added weight you will notice the most, those 13 grams can be felt. Aesthetically the 2 is a very simple looking device. The front is plain and dark with a small speaker grill, the front camera lens and the fingerprint scanner being the only visible features you can notice when the screen is off. Added to these are a notification LED and two capacitive buttons either of the scanner which light up as thin lines. On the bottom in the centre is the USB type C connector flanked on either side by appears to be two speaker grills but only one is actually used with the other housing the microphone. Up top is a standard audio output plug and a pinhole used for noise cancellation. The right hand edge has a long thin volume rocker just over two thirds of the way up and the power button sits roughly 5mm below this. The right hand edge has something new, a three position alert slider that is used for switching notification priority, this sits directly opposite the volume rocker and has a rough surface to aide grip. As mentioned the rear of the phone has the familiar sandstone back with the camera, focus laser and duel LED flash sitting roughly an inch from the top. The side edges are constructed from an aluminium and magnesium alloy which adds to the quality but it isn’t quite enough to give an all over premium feel.

Display

With constant advances in screen technology many manufacturers are incorporating screens which are flexible or curved, or have ultra high resolutions. OnePlus have shied away from this and have instead opted for a 1080p LTPS LCD unit the same as was on the original One. Given the low cost this is a compromise that makes sense, while screens of higher resolution can be very nice they are a luxury item rather than a necessity even on high end devices.

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Viewing angles are fine with text and images remaining clear even with the phone held at quite obtuse angles. The screen also performed well for me in very bright sunlight (we do get the odd clear day in Scotland) but the response time for the OS to adjust the brightness when first unlocking is slower than I would like.

Camera(s)

One area that OnePlus have rung the changes is with the camera. It still has a 13mp main shooter but it is for from the same sensor. This time the pixel size has been increased to 1.3um which should mean that each image pixel is capable of collecting more light, OnePlus claim this is the largest pixel size on any smartphone camera of this resolution. The end result should mean clearer, more detailed shots in low lighting conditions. Additionally the new camera module also boasts optical image stabilisation (a feature missing from the original), dual LED flash, f/2.0 aperture and laser focusing. The end result is a far more accomplished unit which should mean a higher percentage of quality images than before. On the front there is a ‘5mp distortion free’ module according to the blurb from OnePlus, and they have left it at that rather than being tempted by adding a flash as is becoming popular on a lot of handsets right now.

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While the hardware has undoubtedly been improved the same cannot be said for the camera software. It still does slow motion video, panorama and time lapse shots but the interface is poor and there are no value added features that most OEM’s now include. For a gallery app they have opted for the Google photos app so you wont get anything unique to your OnePlus.

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The end result of all the above is a camera that is very capable in a variety of different settings. Rather than bore you with details of each of the included gallery images I will just say that each shot was taken on auto mode with only manual selection of the flash being off or on.

Software

One of the big controversies with OnePlus in the last year has been their public breakup with Cyanogen Inc., and how the parting would affect future devices. Their answer was to form a ROM development team from within the custom ROM community to create their own Android based OS, and the result was Oxygen OS. If you have ever used a Nexus device or flashed an AOSP based ROM then Oxygen OS will seem very familiar. More and more device manufacturers are keeping the look and feel of standard Android and OnePlus have decided on this course as well. However, where other OEM’s swap out some apps and services for their own, OnePlus sticks pretty rigidly with Google’s offerings. The only notable exceptions are the previously mentioned camera app and the application launcher, with all other differences being some customised settings.

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The Oxygen OS Shelf sits a swipe to the right away from your main launcher screen in the same the Google Now launcher has it’s now page. OnePlus have said that the Shelf is still a beta feature but they decided to make it available anyway (it can be switched off and on in settings). It Contains your most used apps, contacts, the current weather and also allows you to add widgets of your choice. I personally turned it off after a couple of days, but others may like what it brings.

Audio

The speaker in the 2 produces a decent volume but it is far from being of a high quality. Talking and sound effects are OK, but the minute you play some music you soon discover it’s failings. The ROM has the MaxAudio audio effects software and while it can help a bit it isn’t enough to mask the mediocre quality of the hardware. Using headphones is a far better experience as you would expect, but I have seen reports of issues with certain brands.

Development & Customisation

Losing Cyanogen as a ROM provider hasn’t just affected how the ROM works but also how you can theme it. Whereas the OnePlus One had the full power of the Cyanogen Theme Provider, the 2 is almost entirely devoid of theming options. You can switch from normal to dark mode with a choice of accent colours and you can select to use on-screen navigation buttons or stick with the capacitive ones on the lower bezel and that’s about it. The stock ROM will mostly work with custom Layers via the Layers Manager app from the Play Store if you don’t mind rooting your device but it isn’t 100% compatible.

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ROM development will be as good as you can get, once the phone makes it’s way into willing developers hands. Unlike some OEM’s OnePlus don’t expect you to jump through hoops to unlock your device, no nasty propriety flashing utilities, just good old fastboot and adb the way Google intended. Not only have they made it easy to unlock, they actively encourage it. One of the better things OnePlus did on social media was to post links to custom ROM’s they thought owners might like to try, I expect the same this time round. To aide buyers in this act they actually include all the drivers and software you need (for Windows, Mac and Linux) on a partition on the phone which you can just copy off when you connect the device to your computer.
Because devices are still only trickling out there is currently only one custom ROM on the XDA web site, a CM 12.1 build that at the time of writing still has a few bugs, but expect the forum to explode with new ROM’s over the coming weeks.

Performance

With a Snapdragon 810 SOC and 4G of RAM (3G in the 16G version) the 2 performs as well as you would expect. Well it almost does, I find that the device seems to stutter every now and then regardless of what task it is doing. Since the last OS update the number of times this happens has greatly reduced but it does very occasionally still happen. Much has been made of the Snapdragon 810 overheating issues since it first hit the market but to date I have yet to encounter anything worse than I would get pushing any of my previous phones. Yes it warms up, but not overly so. One of the ways OnePlus claims to have dealt with the heat issue is through their software control of core switching to stop any core being overused, they have also attached a graphite heat sync to dissipate the heat in an even manner.

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PSA: Don’t be a jerk when testing http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/psa-dont-be-a-jerk-when-testing/ http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/psa-dont-be-a-jerk-when-testing/#comments Tue, 25 Aug 2015 23:28:58 +0000 http://www.landofdroid.com/?p=42019 PSA: Don’t be a jerk when testing

Earlier today, Koushik Dutta’s latest app, Vysor was leaked by someone on Reddit. Koush is being a good sport about this and providing insight via Google+. Nonetheless, I feel it is important to say a word or two about what it means to be a tester. When someone asks you to test their product, whether […]

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PSA: Don’t be a jerk when testing

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Earlier today, Koushik Dutta’s latest app, Vysor was leaked by someone on Reddit. Koush is being a good sport about this and providing insight via Google+. Nonetheless, I feel it is important to say a word or two about what it means to be a tester.

When someone asks you to test their product, whether that is an app or a device, they are asking for your implicit trust. Sometimes it comes along with a free version of the product, the experience of using a product before anyone else, direct input to get features or functionality you desire, or nothing at all. At the end of the day you are the person agreeing to help out testing either for something or for free.

When you go ahead and leak the beta link to an app, as what happened in this case, or photos of a to be released product, or anything really you are violating that trust. You are also burning a silly amount of bridges. Furthermore, you’re being a total jerk. You agreed to help someone by testing their thing, then you steal or post pictures of the thing.

I can guarantee you that nobody will want that person to help with anything secretive again. They were invited to a beta testing group, and they blew apart the test. This also made Koush have to take responsibility for actions that were not his own and have to answer a ton of questions that, from the wording of posts, he was not ready to answer yet. That person was not thinking of the overall process of making a cool thing or the consequences Koush would have to face down the road.

Perhaps part of this is that indie developers or big companies need to screen their testers better. I would be remiss in not saying that for sure. At the end of the day, however, it is up to the people entrusted to do the thing they said they would do. This means not leaking the hell out of it on Reddit or anywhere else.

If you are ever invited to help test something, keep in mind the negative effects of leaking said something. Not only do you make the creator have to be on the spot, answer questions they are not prepared to and possibly change or negate the entire project. Not only do you now create an influx of people using a “not ready for prime time” product which can influence development time. Not only, as in this case, have you now flooded a dev with a zillion more bug reports than they would have to deal with otherwise. Oh no, that’s not all. Most importantly you look untrustworthy and shady. Nobody will ever ask you to do anything with that level of trust again. And for what? All you’ve gained is 30 seconds of internet fame.

Pro tip, folks: If you want 30 seconds of internet fame, create something like Chocolate Rain. You won’t look nearly as bad and people probably won’t hate you. You may even be asked to do something like that again.

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First custom ROM lands for Oneplus 2 following kernel source release http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/first-custom-rom-lands-for-oneplus-2-following-kernel-source-release/ http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/first-custom-rom-lands-for-oneplus-2-following-kernel-source-release/#respond Mon, 24 Aug 2015 13:07:52 +0000 http://www.landofdroid.com/?p=42009 First custom ROM lands for Oneplus 2 following kernel source release

Earlier today OnePlus released the kernel source for their controversial second handset, the OnePlus 2. In doing so they have opened the floodgates for ROM developers to start releasing custom ROM’s based on their own stock ROM as well other bases like AOSP & Cyanogenmod. The first ROM to hit the XDA developers site is […]

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First custom ROM lands for Oneplus 2 following kernel source release

Earlier today OnePlus released the kernel source for their controversial second handset, the OnePlus 2. In doing so they have opened the floodgates for ROM developers to start releasing custom ROM’s based on their own stock ROM as well other bases like AOSP & Cyanogenmod.

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The first ROM to hit the XDA developers site is a CM 12.1 build by Grarak, although it is far from complete. Currently it will boot and the display, touchscreen and camera function but not much else. If you are the brave sort and fancy having a look (and with 64GB of storage, you have plenty space to back up your current ROM) you can download from the developers XDA thread thread.

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Sony Xperia M4 Aqua Review http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/sony-xperia-m4-aqua-review/ http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/sony-xperia-m4-aqua-review/#respond Fri, 03 Jul 2015 12:47:27 +0000 http://www.landofdroid.com/?p=41810 Sony Xperia M4 Aqua Review

Introduction The Sony Xperia M4 Aqua was announced by Sony at Mobile World Congress 2015 in March of this year with a claim to be setting “the new mid-range standard”. With flagship specifications such as an octa-core 64-bit Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 615 processor, a 13MP rear facing camera and the flagshipJohn JojJohnthere is little doubt that on paper it should […]

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Sony Xperia M4 Aqua Review

Introduction

The Sony Xperia M4 Aqua was announced by Sony at Mobile World Congress 2015 in March of this year with a claim to be setting “the new mid-range standard”.

Credits: Luca Viscardi

With flagship specifications such as an octa-core 64-bit Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 615 processor, a 13MP rear facing camera and the flagshipJohn JojJohnthere is little doubt that on paper it should live up to the claim being made. Will this be the case when we dive in an have a look?

Build & Aesthetics

Sony are well-known for delivering high quality builds on almost all of their technology however the Xperia M4 Aqua is slightly different from most pieces of Sony technology.

Whilst giving off a premium feel that you would expect from a flagship device they have also mixed in the cost cutting materials such as a plastic frame around the front and back glass panels doing it no favours at all.

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The M4 Aqua suffers from a crowded right frame in terms of ports and buttons with the volume, power, sim card and dedicated camera buttons all crammed in. This makes for an awkward feel in the hand despite the fact that the power button is perfectly placed.

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Over on the left hand side of the device sits the open charge / sync port and the MicroSD slot which is covered by Sony’s usual flappy plastic covers.

2015-07-01 16.31.22 2015-07-01 16.28.38

The top of the device is fairly empty with just the headphone socket and noise cancelling microphone which is much the same as the bottom of the device which hosts the external speaker and primary microphone.

2015-07-01 16.31.27 2015-07-01 16.31.18

Display

In the market this device is being aimed at there is little question that the display is superior to other handsets in the same field. With good to above average viewing angles the device would suit almost any casual user.

2015-07-01 16.21.24 2015-07-01 16.24.21

 

For the fussy type of user, the M4 Aqua display is another area that shows where the premium cost cutting can be seen. Whilst the display is a  720 x 1280 pixel (293.7 ppi pixel density) IPS TFT the colours often look warmer than they should for the quality of TFT being used.

Camera(s)

I’ve never really struggled to write about the cameras on a device however with recent discussions around the quality of the photos taken on the budget Kazam Trooper 450L which Gary is currently reviewing and the budget Honor Holly that James recently reviewed I’ve found myself looking at camera’s in a whole new light.

I often found myself comparing the camera on phones to other phones with the same camera specs however I have always known that this is an unfair comparison as there are a lot more aspects to look at such as the sensor, the aperture and the software used to control and manage the camera.

Just before I started to write this review I managed to catch a 60 second video review of the phone that Clove (who lent us this device) put together and within that review the camera didn’t score too well which actually coincided with my own thoughts before watching the video.

This has led me to reconsider my review methodology for camera’s on phones which I intent to cover in a whole post in the near future but for now, here are the images I’ve taken with the phone and I’ll let you decide how good they are (though I have scored the camera already).

Low Light Rear Facing Camera Low Light Front Facing Camera Rear Facing Camera Front Facing Camera Rear Facing Camera Front Facing Camera Rear Facing Camera Front Facing Camera

Software

Like most OEM’s Sony have skinned their Android user experience to make it stand out from Google Android (a take on AOSP).

The home screen is one of the first areas that Sony have skinned. By pinching the screen with two fingers users can alter the amount of home screens they want (max 7), set a wallpaper, change themes, add widgets / apps and change the home screen settings.

hZlThvFfHQMR8SFZKFhyEayHUXBzZrzWoNsvkOWkoHk 2015-07-03 10.18.53 2015-07-03 10.18.44 2015-07-03 10.18.35 2015-07-03 10.19.01 2015-07-03 10.19.09

Unfortunately, an area that all OEM’s fall down on is adding their own “bloatware” to their skinned Android experience and Sony are no different. On the M4 Aqua there are a total of 22 apps that simply don’t need to be there (comparing to Google Android). Of those 22 apps I would say that 4 of them (AVG Protection, File Commander, NeoReader and OfficeSuite) have no business being on the phone at all.

2015-07-03 10.19.19 2015-07-03 10.19.31 2015-07-03 10.19.37 2015-07-03 10.19.44

The good news for users is the fact that they can remove a lot of the unwanted bloat by simply uninstalling those apps they don’t want (File Commander and OfficeSuite cannot be removed, only disabled).

If the home screen is a little too much for you to handle then don’t panic too much, Sony have added a “Simple Home” to make using the phone that little easier though personally this is something I would never use.

Changing Home Screen Setup Detailing What Will Change Allow Users to Increase Font Size The Simple Home Layout App Drawer in Simple Home Layout Settings Screen in Simple Home Layout

The one good thing about Sony choosing to use their skin on the device is that they add in a lot of new features within settings that Google Android doesn’t normally come with. I won’t detail these for you but the screenshots are below if you want to look.

2015-07-03 10.21.41 2015-07-03 10.21.24 2015-07-03 10.21.50 2015-07-03 10.21.56 2015-07-03 10.22.04 2015-07-03 10.22.11 2015-07-03 10.25.45 2015-07-03 10.22.37 Smart Backlight Smart Screen Rotation

Another part of the software (via an app) is the Theme Store which Sony have offered for a long time (long before Samsung and HTC added theirs). Unlike the other major OEM’s Sony have a number of licensed themes which are of great quality however do carry a price.

2015-07-03 10.22.58 2015-07-03 10.23.14

Sony have also added their battery saving modes to the phone allowing users to save on battery when they most need it however like all battery savers, this will decrease the user experience rendering a lot of “non-essential” apps disabled when they are activated. Admittedly, if you want a phone with a 9 day battery life then Ultra Stamina will be for you (highly unlikely that it will last that long though).

2015-07-03 10.26.35 2015-07-03 10.26.43

A new addition to Sony phones is the built-in answering machine which is a step away from the users own voicemail service via their carrier. This for me is almost useless, it won’t work when you have no signal or when the battery is dead so why Sony decided to add this I will never know.

2015-07-03 10.27.50

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One of Sony’s greatest things on Android is their camera software. Despite being overloaded with features, the camera modes (apps) offer something for everyone from the budding photographer that likes to change ISO, white balance etc.. to those who simply use their camera for social and fun.

Default Apps Default Apps Downloadable Apps Downloadable Apps

Overall the User Experience is very nice, there are no stutters and Sony have tried to cater for all types of user with their software additions.

Sound

The sound output from the M4 Aqua is no different to almost all devices on the marked just now (exceptions are devices like the HTC One M9), loud music in an indoor environment with little to no background noise is possible but the minute you add any background noise you can forget it.

With the volume set to max the output can be a little tinny on bass or voice heavy audio. I certainly wouldn’t recommend listening to a voice heave podcast on the external speaker at full volume as it tends to be over modulated.

As expected though, the on call volume levels are perfect, perhaps a little too loud on ma setting to the point where everyone else can hear the call around you.

Development Options

Like almost every Sony device, the option to root is there however at the moment there is little in the way of actual development for the handset.

  1. Root the Sony Xperia M4 Aqua
  2. Sony Xperia M4 Aqua Development

Performance

With 2 GB RAM and a Mid-Range Qualcomm MSM8939 Snapdragon 615 Octa-Core CPU with 4 cores clocked at 1.5 GHz and the other 4 at 1GHz this phone should fly and it sort of does however with that said, the phone does tend to heat up a lot when doing simple things like switching between apps and using the AR modes on the camera though the CPU is seen to slow down to compensate when this happens.

A lot of the blame could be put on Sony’s doorstep for this problem however as we have seen on the latest flagship handset carrying the better and more expensive Qualcomm MSM8994 Snapdragon 810, overheating is a problem that Snapdragon CPU’s are suffering from a lot.

The Snapdragon 615 CPU could also be to blame for the “just average” battery life. On a full charge I was able to get around 10 hours of use whilst moderately using the device during the day and heavy use in the evening.

One of the best aspects of this phone, the IP65 and IP68 rating, is an area in which it excels against its competitors. Sadly for Sony though, it’s not a feature that many will take advantage of (outside the odd photo in the rain or making a call outdoors when it’s pouring) and it’s not likely to create a surge in sales for this reason.

The M4 Aqua is perhaps overpowered for its price range and its target market but it’s let down in so many other areas such as the optics that this sadly looks to be where Sony have spent the most of their money.

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Acer Liquid Jade S Review http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/acer-liquid-jade-s-review/ http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/acer-liquid-jade-s-review/#respond Tue, 30 Jun 2015 17:30:44 +0000 http://www.landofdroid.com/?p=41743 Acer Liquid Jade S Review

Introduction Acer is one of the phone manufacturers we don’t tend to see a lot of here in the UK. Sure they have released a number of lower end/budget phones, but it is rare I ever see one when I am out and about. Acer laptops and tablets, however, I tend to see fairly often. […]

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Acer Liquid Jade S Review

Introduction

Acer is one of the phone manufacturers we don’t tend to see a lot of here in the UK. Sure they have released a number of lower end/budget phones, but it is rare I ever see one when I am out and about. Acer laptops and tablets, however, I tend to see fairly often. Whilst the Acer Liquid Jade S is not necessarily a new phone, since it was released in December 2014, it offers a quality spec sheet on a relatively small budget, selling at £229 direct from Acer. It brings a number of improvements to its predecessor, the Acer Liquid Jade, such as a 64bit 8 core processor with 2GB RAM. It also offers a dual sim or the ability to use a microSD card as extra storage.

Build & Aesthetics

When I first un-boxed the Jade S, I wasn’t blown away. It’s a rounded rectangle with a glass front, after all. After having had some time with it, I am getting more and more besotted. This thing reminds me of the HTC One S, which is probably my favourite phone in regards to how it feels in the hand. It weighs a massive 116g, which I’m fairly sure is one of the lightest 5″ phones I have had the pleasure id using. Sure, that hints that some costs may have been cut on pricier materials such as metal. The Jade S is also 7.8mm thick which makes the phone feel considerably smaller than a 5″ phone, such as the Nexus 5, normally does. Both the weight and the thinness mean it does feel great in the hand, albeit maybe a little bit unnerving when first getting used to it. It also doesn’t look odd nestled in your trouser pocket when out and about.

The front of the phone is dominated by the Gorilla Glass 3 covered display and a faux-metal plastiky looking ear piece at the top and an Acer logo at the bottom. There is a metallic band around the side of the phone that protects the side of the screen and wraps around to the back.

The back is actually rather nice. Acer has curved the back at either edge to make it fit snug in your palm, with a more square bottom and top. This is broken up by a ‘camera nipple’ at the top with a flash to the left, another Acer logo, and a speaker grill at the bottom. The back is not meant to be removed, so there is also the Dual Sim tray to the left, and the volume rocker to the right, with the power button positioned rather unforgivably at the top along with the 3.5mm port. The USB can be found offset on the bottom edge.

I’m not a fan of how they have set up the dual SIM  and microSD. You can’t use both at the same time as the second SIM slot doubles up as the microSD card slot. This isn’t something only Acer are guilty of, as I have seen this in a number of other dual SIM phones coming out of late; Honor have been guilty of the same with their recently released 6+.

Acer Liquid Jade S Front Bottom: Acer Logo Front Top: Earpiece Power Buttons: These need to be on the side,. Charge port is offset from the centre Rather flimsy feeling volume rocker Camera Nippe and Power Button SIM/SD Tray and Camera Loudspeaker

Display

The front of the Jade S is dominated by the 5″ IPS LCD 720p display. This gives around a 300ppi density so it is around what you’d expect for a phone in the mid-range of the market, but it is not top of the class. The glass is Gorilla Glass 3 which helps resist scratches and shattering. Coupled with the oleophobic coating finger prints should be less of an issue, too.

If you use your phone for a lot of reading, especially later at night, Acer has included a reading mode which alters the colour on the display. Once activated it reduces the blue light, leaving everything looking at little yellower than normal. You can adjust the strength of this from the display settings as you would the brightness.

I did have issues when trying to view the screen; I struggled when in dark spaces with the brightness set to auto as the white backgrounds seemed to over power the text, leading to some eye strain; I also had issues in outside as the screen was often barely legible in sunlight. This lead to some interesting times when trying to use it to take some photos.

Viewing angles, however, are actually rather good on the Jade S. Text remains easy to read when the phone is tilted away and colour very consistent and not washed out.

Camera

The main camera on the Jade S sports a 13MP sensor and an aperture of f/1.8 and an “ultra-fast focus” (according to marketing materials). There is also some processing in use that Acer like to call “Bright Magic” and AcerRapid™. This seems to be rather similar, if not the same, as what they use on the newer Jade Z. According to Acer, this means that the main camera ensures that pictures are always bright even when taken in darker environments, although that seems to be at the expense of excess noise

Other camera features include; voice control which allows you to say “Cheese” to take a photo with the 13 MP F1.8 rear camera or say “Selfie” and the front camera takes a selfie for you; Dual Shot lets users make a collage of simultaneous shots from the front and rear cameras for Picture-in-Picture and Video-in-Video; Gourmet Mode will make Instagram feeds more beautiful with delicious shots; and for non tech-savvy types Auto-Scene-Detect will intuitively set the best camera settings.

In camera actually seemed to work pretty well. There are a number of preset camera modes either to air brush yourself (please stop including this), take pictures of food, or normal use such as landscape, kids, or cat pics. In daylight I was able to get the shot I wanted fairly quick and with no messing around. Lowlight? Not as quick, and not as good. The flash helped a little but things did end a little yellow.

This was taken whilst walking. Whilst a little blurry, I have seen people post worse on facebook. Penguins... Colours washed out a little. Focus up close on the fish worked quite nicely. Fish didn't seem happy, though (No flash though, don't worry) Occasionally it took too long to take the photo. Not often, but it did happen. Okay, so the balls was probably moving about 1m/s here, but it hasn't done too bad. ... Or just a photo of food. Can't tell any difference

The front camera? Well. That works, and you can take pictures. But I wouldn’t advise taking them in low light. As seen below, featuring an obligatory grotesque selfie, the front camera really struggles in low light. Even when you do make it so your face is illuminated to help the camera out.

I don't like selfies... ... so I may as well mess around.

Software

Released with Android KitKat (4.4.4), the Jade S has been modified a fair bit by Acer. It still feels pretty stock and isn’t as in your face as Sense of TouchWiz, but you can tell there are changes.

The lock screen has been tweaked to give you access to whichever apps you have in your dock. These float in the middle, level with water that reacts when the phone is tilted, playing on the Liquid phone series name. You also get the time and weather as default. The home screen is fairly standard, with a number of preferences available with a pinch gesture. The app drawer is pretty much as you would expect from an Android phone.

Acer modified the notification bar, and drop down menus. All of the toggles have been redesigned, but the features stay the same. On the notification panel itself you will also see 4/5 icons along the top above the notification, which can be swapped out by pressing the caret and then picking settings.

The task switches has also been changed. Acer have added their float apps, originally branded as AcerFLOAT. This is something they have had on their phones for a while, and it is also something I wish more companies would bring. Whilst it could be considered bloat, some of the apps are pretty useful. Along with the obvious ones for being able to float a browser, calculator, and notes, you are able to float a minimal camera UI, allowing you to take photos without leaving what you are doing. There are also a number of widgets for adding extra device control buttons, in case you want 2 home buttons on your screen at once?

There isn’t much built-in for customising your device, which seems to be a growing trend recently. The extent of what you can do is change your associated SIM colours, which is stock on Android, and change the theme from stock to Acer. From what I can tell this just makes some bars more green than they otherwise were.

If you’re sat there searching for when Lollipop is going to be released for the Jade S, I only bring bad news. Acer are committed to the newer Jade Z in regards to updates. That means that the Z will get Lollipop first, with the Jade S targeted for Q3 2015… By which time Android M will likely be in full swing and making its way to the newer devices. On the plus side, this is more Lollipop than you’re ever going to see on a HTC One Mini 2.

Sound

The audio on the Jade S is a mixed bag for me. The speaker for voice calls is fine, as is the loud-speaker should you wish to publicise your call to those around you; Voices are crisp and clear with very little distortion when up on the maximum volume. However… Music.

Acer has included Dolby DTS which enhances some of the sound as it sounded slightly cleaner when used over the speaker. The speaker just is not good enough for media as it can not be set to a loud enough volume and keep the clarity.

Used over headphones it is a different story. Whilst hard to quantify, I did notice a marked difference when listening to music and watching films when I had DTS enabled and set up. Bass and treble were good and distortion was not an issue.

Otherwise the ringer for notifications and calls seems to be plenty loud enough.

Development Options

There’s little going on here. Given that it was a review device I wasn’t able to test anything, however XDA has a thread or two.

[Official] Acer Liquid Jade S (S56)

[GUIDE] Firmwares, ROMs, CWM, Root – Acer Liquid MTK Smartphones

I did enquire about a possible API for the Float apps, however, the response I got suggested this is not something they are going to open up for users to develop for which is a shame. I really like them.

Performance

The jade S has a spec sheet that puts it to the upper end of the mid range thanks specifically to the 1.5 GHz Octa-core Mediatek processor, and 2GB RAM. This is more than enough for everyday tasks. Managing rather large documents in Google Sheets was a breeze with no slow downs or annoying input lag. The same goes for running games such as Motorsport Manager. The Jade S does have a tendency to get a little warm under general use, though. When browsing the internet or watching YouTube videos I found myself having to stop after 30 minutes or so for the phone to cool down. By no means is it unbearable, I just don’t like electronics to cook.

The only issue I had was with the screen possibly being an under or over sensitive. When using apps that use lists, such as reddit and twitter clients; I found there to be a few odd moments when scrolling, with it deciding to scroll up or down half the page, loosing my current position.

The battery life was a little mixed for me. Rated at 2300mAh the capacity sits around the average capacity for a 5inch device. On standby with 2 SIMs I gave up after 5 or 6 days. In general use I was getting a about a 1.5days out of it with no issues, with around 2-3 hours average screen on per day and a fair bit of music playback / streaming. Heavier use and you may well find yourself having to charge before the end of the day.

There are a few caveats to the setup of the Jade S. Whilst it is dual SIM, with the main SIM getting LTE up to 150mbps, the second SIM only runs at 2G. Wifi (b/g/n) is on board, which also allows for creating a hotspot for other devices, but there is no DLNA support. GPS seemed to make a lock fairly quickly at times, provided I was out in the clear, however when running through a coppice it did have issues keeping track of me.

There are a few cut downs on connectivity as there is no NFC or USB OTG support.

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Honor Holly Review http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/honor-holly-review/ http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/honor-holly-review/#respond Tue, 16 Jun 2015 11:49:46 +0000 http://www.landofdroid.com/?p=41813 Honor Holly Review

Introduction In a world of Octa-core CPU’s, 20mp cameras, and £700 phones sometimes its nice to look in the other direction. What phone do you recommend to your friends for say, a teen about to get her first smart phone, or a granny looking to talk to her children with video? Over the last few […]

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Honor Holly Review

Introduction

In a world of Octa-core CPU’s, 20mp cameras, and £700 phones sometimes its nice to look in the other direction. What phone do you recommend to your friends for say, a teen about to get her first smart phone, or a granny looking to talk to her children with video?

Over the last few years, mainly led by the excellent Moto G, budget phones have become far better than before. While some companies still sell under powered, over priced “budget phones” other companies have stepped up to the plate and dealt us really cracking devices.

Honor, the new brand from Huawei, are one such company and with the release of the Holly they have aimed straight at the sub £100, first time buyer market, and struck dead centre

Build & Aesthetics

The Honor Holly is not fancy. You won’t be getting “Milled from one piece of granite and sanded by virgins” here. What you get however, is a solid device that looks good and functional. It’s plain black glass front and white plastic back actually compliment each other fairly well but it isn’t winning any awards for design.

huawei-honor-holly-01

Build quality is extremely good, the phone feels solid in the hand while not feeling overly heavy. The back peels away without feeling flimsy and it shows throughout that Honor have thought about build quality in a very specific way.

Testament to this thought, I emailed them when I received the device as I felt that the battery was difficult to remove, they responded by saying the battery is designed to be a snug fit and that it reduces knocking noise whilst adding to the over all rigidity of the phone.

Thinking on it a little more I was impressed at the thought that went into it and you know what? They are right! The phone does feel rigid in the hand it also doesn’t suffer any of the creaking you get in budget devices.

Display

The Holly has a fairly decent IPS LCD display running at 720p and it’s just peachy. The viewing angles are perfectly acceptable and the colours are rich and vibrant.

720p I hear you gasp! surely it’s 1080p or GTFO? No, 720p is more than adequate on a 5″ display and not once did I feel the display let me down in terms of viewing pleasure.

The biggest drawback I have found on the Holly is the glass. The budget factor of the device shows up in this area and the review device has picked up a fairly deep scratch in the middle of the screen from being in my pocket. I would recommend a glass screen protector straight away which can be picked up for as little £3.99 (well worth it to protect your screen).

Camera

I will start with the negative. 2mp for a front facing camera is not enough, we live in a selfie world now there is no escaping it. Everybody does it (even grannies) and at for this reason 2mp is just not going to cut it. In anything other than perfect light the front facing camera is a bust.

Night time Day time

OK so back to positives…

The 8mp rear facing camera is actually pretty good in normal lighting conditions. In daylight or well-lit rooms it will be perfectly acceptable for the Facebook generation who only need their pictures to be web quality. Colour reproduction is good, if a little rich and the white balance is not too bad either. Having looked through the Facebook accounts of my non-tech friends I realise how much they don’t really care about good pictures. What they want is the picture right then and there, blurry or not. Personally it makes me want to go on a murderous rampage when I see blurry, awful pictures but I hold it back.

IMG_20150617_134102 IMG_20150617_134008 IMG_20150617_133950 IMG_20150617_133933

For the target market the Holly camera is more than enough and compared to its competitors it is ahead of the pack.

Software

*sigh* oh emotionUI how you frustrate me.

Based on Huwawei’s EMUI this launcher is really not very nice. EMUI is made to emulate the iPhone style, in that it has no app drawer and everything is just sat on your main screen cluttering it up like a windows XP desktop with no real order. It’s saving grace is the ability to move the apps into folders however even this is a pretty annoying if you have a large amounts of apps to go through. I’ll be honest I used it for about a week and got so frustrated I put the Google Now Launcher on.

Honor Holly or Windows Desktop?

Lets talk Duality. Dual Sim cards have always been an intriguing idea, with many people having a work phone and home phone this seems like a perfect solution.

The actual process of the dual sim on the Holly works really well, you can even choose between separate tasks for each sim, for example; I use the EE sim to make calls and texts while my GiffGaff runs the data, however because both sims are running at once you can still receive calls and texts from both on the fly. The big issue I have right now is the Dual sim setup seems to stop my contacts from showing up when they call. Maybe its just me not doing it right but I cannot get it to tell me who is calling. very frustrating.

Overall the software is average. If you are an older person coming from a feature phone this will not bother you and if you are a first time phone user you won’t know any different however, if you are coming from another Android device you may find the UI sloppy.

Running Android 4.4.2 it is fast and fluid and I say again it is leagues above anything else in this price bracket.

Sound

The most important speaker on any handset is the one you use to make calls with so we can start there. It’s great, the internal speaker is sharp and not too loud. I know volume is important but too much creates feedback and the Holly just feels the perfect volume for me.

The external speaker however is simply par. I admit I have been spoiled by the M8 speakers but the Holly has a single rear facing speaker that is loud but slightly tinny. It will do for quickly showing a friend YouTube videos but for a BBQ you may want to pick up a Bluetooth speaker.

Development Options

Development for the Honor Holly is certainly out there. XDA has several threads for rooting and custom ROMS including the latest Cyanogen and MIUI. I see no reason to root this device however. There is a target audience for this phone and that isn’t the hardcore modding community. The target audience is, as I have said, is the young and first time phone buyers, the kind of people who just want the phone to work.

That said, if you do want to play then you can find info here: http://forum.xda-developers.com/android/general/huawei-honor-holly-hol-u19-root-t2996617

Performance

The Honor Holly uses a Quad-core 1.3 GHz Cortex-A7 Mediatek MT6582 chipset with a Mali-400MP2 GPU. Now I don’t really know what any of that means but I can tell you the Holly is fast. I haven’t felt it couldn’t keep up with anything I threw at it. Its handling of the dual sim flip-flopping is flawless and while I don’t play many games the games I do throw it seem to work fine.

The device hasn’t suffered from over heating like some of it’s bigger cousins do and using it as a daily device really has worked fine.

Battery life also seems to be spot on. The days of me trying to squeeze out more than a days battery are gone. The reality of the world we live in is simple, you will have to charge your phone every night. All I ever ask is that a device lasts from when I wake up, around 6:30am to when I go to sleep, around 11:30pm. The Holly does that with room to spare (normally about 20% left) which is good enough for me. This usage is with fair to high use of music streaming, phone calls, constant hangout messages, Skype and YouTube.

 

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ARCHOS VR Glasses Review http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/archos-vr-glasses-review/ http://www.landofdroid.com/2015/archos-vr-glasses-review/#respond Wed, 10 Jun 2015 10:30:11 +0000 http://www.landofdroid.com/?p=41791 ARCHOS VR Glasses Review

Introduction Virtual Reality Glasses are fast becoming the tech of the future. It seems every major OEM (and even Social Network) are getting into the market space with their take on the technology with things like Google Cardboard, Oculus Rift and HTC Vive already being the major contenders for the number one slot. On the 16th […]

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ARCHOS VR Glasses Review

Introduction

Virtual Reality Glasses are fast becoming the tech of the future. It seems every major OEM (and even Social Network) are getting into the market space with their take on the technology with things like Google Cardboard, Oculus Rift and HTC Vive already being the major contenders for the number one slot.

On the 16th of October 2014 Archos announced their entry into the VR world with the ARCHOS VR Glasses so we asked the simple question, will this entry-level product be able to compete in a world which is fast filling up?

Let’s dive into the review and find out more!

Build & Aesthetics

The Archos VR Glasses are cheap, I don’t just mean in cost but from start to finish it’s very obvious that there has been little money or effort spent in designing this product. The plastics are terribly weak, the lenses are nowhere near the quality of those supplied on Google Cardboard and the head band is simply uncomfortable with no form of padding at all.

avr-slide_03 avr-slide_04 avr-slide_05

There are expandable parts of the glasses to make them compatible with larger or smaller phones that are on a ratchet styled plastic however I felt that each time I expanded it to fit a bigger phone I was going to snap or at least damage the grooves that it uses.

10

Looks wise, it looks the part. It manages to pull off the illusion that you are getting a premium product for a budget price however it should be noted that this really is a budget product for a budget price.

Software

Archos do not officially provide software for the glasses, they simply point you to a whole list of compatible apps on Google Play. Note that I emphasised the word compatible as from my own perspective, using the OnePlus One, Honor 6 and Samsung Galaxy S5, I never really felt that any of the apps were compatible with these glasses.

Performance

The point of VR Glasses is that you are meant to feel deeply immersed into the virtual world you are seeing through the glasses. It is supposed to engulf your field of view to give the illusion that you are part of what you are seeing however at no point wearing these glasses did I ever feel immersed. There was far too much light getting into the glasses from the outside and I had to squint my eyes a lot to “make them work” which you shouldn’t have to do.

avr-slide_01 avr-slide_02

Conclusion

When Google Cardboard was announced at Google I/O 2014 I was one of the people who picked up a clone pair via the TinyDeal website for next to nothing. Though the build quality was nowhere near Google Cardboard quality it was actually OK.

I showed this amazing and immensely cheap accessory off wherever I could, it blew people’s minds when they seen such a pathetic looking piece of cardboard do things they could never have even thought possible.

When I seen the Archos VR Glasses come out I thought, excellent, these would replace my (now in bad condition) cardboard glasses and will at least last me way longer too…

Sadly this was not the case, I was left highly disappointed and without a good VR accessory as I took a drastic step in binning my cardboard before these arrived.

The total score shown on this review is 2.5 however I would say it’s closer to 1.5 at best, don’t waste your money on these as you will regret it.

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